The Official MotorSport New Zealand Manual

Schedule H

Schedule H – Event Safety

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Appendix Two – Schedule H
Event Safety

Supervision of the Roads and Emergency Services

Contents

Part One – Objects and Reporting Requirements

Article 1 Object
Article 2 Accident and medical reporting

Part Two – Race Events

Article 1 Safety Plan
Article 2 Control of Event
Article 3 Supervision of the Circuit
Article 4 Signalling
Article 5 Intervention
Article 6 Intervention Vehicles
Article 7 Event Testing
Article 8 Specific Requirement for Truck Race Interventions

Part Three – Rallies and Rallysprints

Preamble
Article 1 Safety Plan
Article 2 Control of Event
Article 3 Safety of the Public and Officials
Article 4 Safety of the Competing Crews

Part Four – ClubSport Events

Preamble
Article 1 Safety Plan
Article 2 Control of the Event
Article 3 Safety of the Public and Officials
Article 4 Safety of the Competing Crews
Note: Text changes from the previous issue of this Schedule are highlighted such. Text changes for grammatical and/or formatting reasons are not highlighted.

Part One – Objects and Reporting Requirements

1.
Object:
1.1
This Schedule shall define the aims and organisation of the supervision of the road and emergency services and establish the rules to be observed in achieving these objectives.
1.2
The supervision of the road is intended to maintain safe conditions for the running of the Meeting or Event and the emergency services to provide the specialised support necessary to this end.
1.3
Throughout this Schedule all operations are under the overall control of the Clerk of the Course or Race Director except for Events where MotorSport NZ appoints an Event Director. On such Events the Event Director will assume over riding authority and responsibility.
1.4
This Schedule should be read in conjunction with the MotorSport NZ Code of Practice – Fuel Handling. This code is published on the MotorSport NZ website (www.motorsport.org.nz)
1.5
The prescriptions of this Schedule apply to all Events as below and should be read in conjunction with the appropriate Organisers Handbook. Each Handbook details the preferred methods of meeting the (Schedule H) criteria (i.e. the minimum standards deemed appropriate to achieve the criteria):

  • Part Two – Race Events;
    (refer also to the Race Organisers Handbook).
  • Part Three – Rally and Rallysprint Events;
    (refer also to the Rally Organisers Handbook).
  • Part Four – ClubSport Events;
    (refer also to the ClubSport Organisers Handbook).
Note: The Organiser Handbooks are available from the MotorSport NZ office or on the website (www.motorsport.org.nz).
2.
Accident and Medical Reporting:
2.1
Necessity for report: Whenever an accident occurs, in a Meeting or Event, which causes the hospitalisation of any person or significant distortion of the vehicle’s cockpit or cabin, the Organisers will be responsible for ensuring that a detailed report on the circumstances, the injuries and any damage to vehicles, is submitted to MotorSport NZ.
Should an accident occur on a road closed for competition purposes or on a permanent race venue outside of the time limits of a Meeting or Event permit the organisers and/or venue operators are obliged to keep MotorSport NZ fully informed and furnish details of the accident.
Note: The Accident and Injury Reporting Procedure guidelines are published as MotorSport NZ form MA3, available from the MotorSport NZ website or from the MotorSport NZ office.
2.2
Accident Reporting: The report should be made on the MotorSport Accident Report Form ACC01 obtainable from the MotorSport NZ website (www.motorsport.org.nz) and as far as possible include a sketch or photographs of scene made immediately after the accident; a Scrutineers or Technical Officer’s report on the condition of the vehicle; medical reports; marshals’ and eye witness reports.
2.3
Medical Reporting: All medical reporting as required shall be completed using MotorSport NZ On Site Medical Assessment form MA1:

(1)
Mandatory Reporting: It is mandatory for Organisers to ensure that a medical report is completed and submitted to MotorSport NZ for any injury accident to:

(a)
Any competitor who requires hospitalisation, or
(b)
Any competitor who the on-event medical staff determine is unfit to compete, or
(c)
Any officials, team members / crew, spectators, or any other person, injured as a result of a competition accident.
(2)
Optional Reporting: Any competitor suffering an impact accident, other than as described above, must be assessed by the on-event medical staff at the earliest opportunity as to whether the competitor is fit to continue competing. Where a competitor is declared fit to compete, the requirement to complete the MA1 form is optional, however in any case shall be reported to the Clerk of the Course.

Part Two – Race Events

Note: This part should be read in conjunction with Appendix Four Schedule Z.

1.
Safety Plan:
1.1
For each event there will be a Safety Plan. The Clerk of the Course or an assistant will direct its implementation during the Event.
Note: A Safety Plan template for Race Events may be found on the MotorSport NZ website (www.motorsport.org.nz).
1.2
This Safety Plan shall include:

(1)
A map or drawing of the circuit noting all flag points, MotorSport NZ approved photographer and television camera locations and locations of all other services.
(2)
The communications network(s) and personnel on each.
(3)
Details of public safety and security measures, and details of authorised areas for accredited media including safety measures and shall name the chief of each of these services directly responsible to the Clerk of the Course or his assistant.
(4)
The manning level of flag points.
(5)
The Intervention Vehicles locations and manning.
(6)
Details of the fuel handling, storage and safety protocols in relation to the Code of Practice – Fuel as applicable to the type of Event being conducted.
(7)
The Medical Response Plan detailing the specific medical requirements and procedures to ensure that the appropriate medical personnel and necessary equipment can reach the scene of any incident to render optimum care to any casualty. For each level of competition the plan should include:

(a)
The manning and qualification requirements for personnel.
(b)
The Medical Intervention vehicle(s) types required and their location(s).
(c)
The contact details of the closest emergency service provider location(s) and the quickest method of evacuating injured to the nearest hospital.
(d)
(where spectators are allowed access to the Meeting or Event) provisions shall be made to have First Aid facilities available for such cases of spectators either being injured in off-track accidents or taken ill.
Event organisers are advised to liaise with either the District Commander for St John or a registered Medical Practitioner experienced in accident and emergency services for assistance in developing the Medical Response Plan and to ensure that the lines of communication and necessary medical services back up is established.
(8)
The Fire Fighting Response Plan detailing the specific fire safety requirements and procedures to ensure that the appropriate personnel and necessary equipment to provide a complete fire extinguishing response and specialist extraction service. For each level of competition the plan should include the Fire Intervention vehicle(s) types required, their location(s), manning requirements and duties. Event organisers are recommended to liaise with the District Fire Commander for assistance in developing the Fire Fighting Response Plan and to ensure that the lines of communication and necessary back up is established.
1.3
Permanent Circuits: Each Safety Plan for a permanent circuit shall be valid for a twelve month period, commencing on 1 August of each year, and shall stipulate the minimum safety requirements in accordance with Part Two Article 1.2 above for the following levels of competition:

(1)
Clubmans permitted Events; being those Race Events as described in Appendix Four Schedule Z Article 2.1(3)(g), and
(2)
National permitted Events; being those Race Events as described in Appendix Four Schedule Z Article 2.1(3) (excluding Clubmans Race as detailed in Article 1.3(1) above), and including MotorSport NZ Championships or Sanctioned Series, and
(3)
International permitted Events; being those Race Events issued with a MotorSport NZ International Permit, which may include MotorSport NZ Championships or Sanctioned Series.
2.
Control of Event: The Race (Event) Control is the centre of race supervision and direction and should provide the Clerk of the Course and assistants with the facilities necessary to perform these duties in suitable working conditions. The Clerk of the Course or his or her nominee shall remain in the Race Control for the duration of all on-track activities.
3.
Supervision of the Circuit:
3.1
Event Control:

(1)
Control room: A control room, be it a permanent or temporary facility, is the centre of operations for the Event and shall be equipped with the most suitable means of equipment to allow the Clerk of the Course and/or Assistant to communicate quickly with all services necessary for the safe running of the meeting or event. Ideally this room should be soundproofed to minimise external noise.
(2)
Equipment: The Race Control shall be provided with:

(a)
A telephone and/or radio communication with each flag point, safety car, intervention vehicles, rescue services and general service network.
(b)
A telephone connected with a national network.
(c)
An adequate means of voice communication with officials at track level.
(d)
A means of voice communication from the control room to the pit / paddock area for the purpose of communication with competitors and teams. This shall be accomplished by either a public address system and/or by radio communication on a separate channel to any used by Event Officials (“race radio”).
(e)
The main or overriding control unit for a MotorSport NZ approved signal light system, where such system is utilised.
(3)
Duties of Race Control: The Clerk of the Course or nominee in charge of the Race Control is responsible for;

(a)
Authorising the deployment of any emergency service as shall be deemed necessary, and
(b)
The surveillance of the track by the naked eye or a closed circuit television system. Any portion of the circuit not able to be observed thus shall have Observers, able to communicate directly with Race Control, positioned, and
(c)
Ensuring that a proper log reflecting all flag and observers’ reports is kept so that action may be taken where appropriate.
(d)
Further, it shall at all times be his responsibility to see that the competition is run in full compliance with the National Sporting Code its Appendices, Schedules and the Supplementary Regulations for the event.
3.2
Operation:

(1)
Closing of the Circuit: Before the start of any part of an Event, or if the circuit has been re-opened, it is the duty of the Clerk of the Course or nominee, to undertake the closing of the road, ensuring that the road is quite free from any obstacle, all observers and marshals, emergency service personnel and equipment are duly posted and all access ways onto and off the track are closed.

(a)
The closing of the circuit can be achieved by;

(i)
Unobstructed visual contact around the entire track, or
(ii)
By communication with each flag and observation point, or
(iii)
By use of a Course car.
(b)
Where a Course car is used the following precautions must be respected:

(i)
The Course car closing the circuit must never overtake and leave behind any other vehicle running on the circuit.
(ii)
The officials in the Course car must report to the Clerk of the Course on completion of the reconnaissance lap.
(2)
Reopening the Circuit: After the end of the event or when a long break is anticipated, the Clerk of the Course or nominee shall undertake the opening of the circuit by;

(a)
Unobstructed visual contact around the entire track, or
(b)
By communication with each observation point.
After which service vehicles can enter to collect service personnel and equipment and remove broken-down cars and wreckage.
3.3
Flag Points:

(1)
These points provide surveillance of the circuit and its immediate surroundings and shall be manned as detailed in this Article except for Truck races or Truck practice sessions.
For all Truck practice, testing/qualifying sessions and races, all personnel on flag points shall vacate the points and retire to a position of safety behind second line of protection.
The only exceptions being specific locations approved by the MotorSport NZ Circuit Safety Department and are limited to:

(a)
The flag point in closest proximity of the start finish line, and/or
(b)
Any other specific points which;

(i)
Afford at least two(2) lines of protection, and
(ii)
Have good line of sight for the competitors, and
(iii)
Are in a position approved by the Circuit Safety Department.
These points shall be used to display any flag or light signals requested by the Clerk of the Course.
(2)
Number and location: These are determined by the MotorSport NZ Circuit Safety Department and are detailed on the Venue Licence.
(3)
Protection: The points must be situated so that only in the case of an incident should their staff be compelled to operate unprotected.
(4)
Equipment: Each point shall be provided with:

(a)
A communication system that enables clear and unobstructed communication with Race Control.
(b)
A set of signalling flags for use under the supervision of the senior flag marshal attached to the point; each set to include two(2) yellow flags. Any supplementary or relay points must also be equipped with appropriate set of flags.
(c)
One(1) portable fire extinguisher of at least 4Kg capacity in cases where the point personnel are required to act as first intervention.
(d)
One(1) or more stiff brooms.
(e)
A quantity of oil absorbing material.
Notes:
1. If a signal light system is used, the flags referred to in (b) are to be used only in case of failure of the light system.
2. The equipment in (d) and (e) can alternatively be available from a suitable Track Maintenance vehicle.
3. For the specific points referred to as supplementary or relay points in (4)(b) of this Article the minimum equipment required is a communication system with the Clerk of the Course and yellow and red flags or lights.
(5)
Flag Point Staff:

(a)
Each flag point during official testing/qualifying sessions and racing shall be placed under the responsibility of a Post Chief with at least one(1) more person who has received training in the duties of a flag marshal.
(b)
Where a MotorSport NZ approved signal light system is used manning may be reduced to one(1) flag marshal per flag point, except that in the event of signal light failure, all on-track activities must immediately be halted until either the signal light system becomes operational, or the flag point manning levels are increased to the levels described in (5)(a) above.
(c)
For other practice sessions it is permitted to reduce the minimum staffing level to one(1) on the proviso that any session will be immediately stopped in the event of any accidents in the sector of responsibility of the point.
(d)
For Clubmans permitted Events or Events issued with a MotorSport NZ permit and for that Meeting or Event other practice sessions it is mandatory only to man the flag points marked “compulsory manning” on the Venue Licence. Ideally those marked Clubmans optional should also be manned if available trained staffing permits.
(e)
Marshals should not wear clothing similar in colour to any signalling flag, particularly red or yellow.
(6)
Duties: The Post Chief must maintain communications with Race Control and each point shall:

(a)
Warn drivers by means of signalling of any danger or difficulty, which they are unable to foresee, and
(b)
Report immediately to Race Control any incidents, which occur within the zone limits or sector of responsibility of the point, and
(c)
Report to Race Control any unsporting or dangerous behaviour, particularly with regard to code of conduct (refer Appendix Four Schedule Z), and
(d)
Maintain its sector of the circuit clean and clear of obstacles, attempting to remove any spilled oil, unless expressly requested not to, with the aid of an absorbent substance, brooms and spades.
(e)
Report to Race Control any incidents concerning spectator safety or security.
(f)
Not leave the point before the circuit has been declared open at the end of an event.
(7)
Interventions: It is normally the duty of the crash/rescue marshals to make the first intervention in case of an incident, any variance from this procedure will be detailed in the Event Safety Plan.
(8)
Driving Standards Observers: These Observers shall be positioned behind an approved first line of protection.
4.
Signalling:
4.1
In the supervision of the circuit, the Clerk of the Course (or the assistant) rely largely on the use of signals to contribute to the driver’s safety and enforce the regulations.

(1)
Daytime: Signals are given in daytime either by:

(a)
different coloured flags, or alternatively
(b)
A MotorSport NZ approved signal light system. Where a signal light system is used, each flag point must be equipped with the full set of flags in case of equipment failure. Additionally, all competitors must be briefed on the usage of the lights and the process to be followed in case of signal light failure.
Note: The flags and boards that are only displayed at the start/finish line shall still be used.
(2)
Night time: Signals are given at night by a MotorSport NZ approved signal light system, or alternatively, by a minimum of a red light and a yellow light at each point. All competitors must be briefed on the usage of the lights and the process to be followed in case of signal light failure.
4.2
Flags and signal light system:

(1)
Use of Flags or signal light system: Flags or an approved signal light system will be used during both practice and racing. The reasons for use and meanings attributed to these signals are detailed in Appendix Four Schedule Z.
(2)
Flag signals used exclusively by the Clerk of the Course or their nominee: These flags, with the exception of the starting or finishing flag may be authorised to be displayed at places other than the Start Line should visibility, length of the circuit or the speed of the cars make this advisable.

(a)
Starting Flag:
Usually the New Zealand flag.
Note 1: Should this not be the case, the colour of the flag, which must not cause confusion with any already existing flag, must be specified in the Supplementary Regulations.
(b)
Finishing flag:
A black and white chequered flag.
(c)
Red flag:
(d)
Black and white flag:
Flag divided into black and white halves split diagonally.
Note 2: Shown together with a white number on a black signalling board that includes the words Time Penalty, or
Note 3: Shown together with a white number on a black signalling board.
(e)
Black flag:
Note 4: Shown together with either a white number on a black signalling board, or
Note 5: Shown together with a white number on a black signalling board that includes the words Drive Through Penalty.
(f)
Black flag with orange disc (40 cm in diameter):
Note 6: Shown together with a white number on a black signalling board.
(3)
Flags used at the Flag points: Flags used by the marshals shall be shown stationary (least danger) or waved (danger extreme, caution required). Depending on the severity of the incident, the Yellow and/or Yellow with Red Stripes flags may be displayed double waved.
(4)
Light signals at the flag points: A MotorSport NZ approved signal light system may replace the following flags, and shall convey the following meanings:

(a)
One(1) yellow light illuminated – same meaning as one(1) waved yellow flag.
(b)
Yellow light(s) divided into two equal segments, each alternately flashing – same meaning as two(2) waved yellow flags.
(c)
The letters ‘S C’ illuminated – same meaning as the Safety Car Board as described in Appendix Four, Schedule Z.
(d)
Green light illuminated – same meaning as green flag.
(e)
Blue light illuminated – same meaning as blue flag.
(f)
Yellow light with red strips flashing – same meaning as yellow with red stripes flag.
(g)
Red light – same meaning as red flag and may only be used under the direction and control of the Clerk of the Course.
(h)
White light – same meaning as a white flag.
(5)
Flag or light signals at pit exit: Lights are the preferred option.

(a)
During Testing / Qualifying two(2) signals are required:

(i)
A red flag or red light(s), visible to pit lane only, denoting that the pit exit is closed.
(ii)
A green flag or green light(s) used to show that the pit exit is open. This signal informs the driver that on exiting the pits there is no immediate traffic at the blend line onto the circuit proper.
(b)
During Racing three(3) signals are required:

(i)
A red flag or red light(s), visible to pit lane only, denoting that the pit exit is closed.
(ii)
A green flag or green light(s) used to show that the pit exit is open. This signal informs the driver that on exiting the pits there is no immediate traffic at the blend line onto the circuit proper.
Note: For races only, the green light is only illuminated prior to the start procedure to allow cars to exit the pit on their preliminary lap, after that the light is turned off.
(iii)
A blue flag or blue light(s) flashing, visible to pit lane only, is shown to any driver exiting the pits during a race to exercise caution as there is likely to be a vehicle already on the circuit proper close to or in the blend line area.
5.
Intervention:
5.1
Definition: Fast intervention vehicles are an essential part of circuit emergency equipment and provide the specialist intervention that may be required at any accident on the circuit or in the pits and paddock area. Intervention vehicles are defined as:

(1)
Course Car
(2)
Safety Car
(3)
Fire Fighting Intervention Vehicles
(4)
Medical Intervention Vehicles
(5)
Rescue Intervention Vehicles
(6)
Extrication Intervention Vehicles
(7)
Other Vehicles
5.2
Duties: There are three main areas of responsibility of intervention these being rescue, firefighting and medical.
6.
Intervention Vehicles:
6.1
Course Car:

(1)
Type / Equipment: The Course Car shall be a vehicle of either two(2) or four(4) wheel drive with seating for a crew of up to four(4) persons. It should be parked in pit lane to facilitate access by the Clerk of the Course and should have:

(a)
Flashing yellow / amber light(s) the roof, and
(b)
Two-way radio communication with Race Control.
Note: The vehicle’s emergency (hazard) flashers may be used in lieu of flashing roof lights.
(2)
Manning: The Course Car shall be manned by the Clerk of the Course or their nominee as required.
(3)
Duties: For use by the Clerk of the Course or their nominee for course clearance and attending incidents as required.
6.2
Safety Car:

(1)
Type / Equipment: The Safety Car shall be a vehicle of either two(2) or four(4) wheel drive with seating for a crew of up to four(4) persons and shall have:

(a)
The words “Safety Car” in letters of similar dimensions to those of the race numbers, on the rear and sides, and
(b)
Flashing yellow / amber lights on the roof, and
(c)
A green light installed in a position easily seen by the driver of a competing car following. This light being controlled by the observer and used in re-establishing the correct race order behind the Safety Car, and
(d)
Two-way radio communication with Race Control.
(2)
Manning: The Safety Car crew shall be attired in fire resistant clothing including gloves and shall:

(a)
Be driven by an experienced circuit driver who shall hold either a current C2 Grade competition licence, or has previously held an equivalent grade competition licence.
(b)
An observer is required and shall be a person capable of recognising the competing cars and who is in permanent radio contact with Race Control. The observer shall convey instructions to following competitors by means of the green light.
(3)
Duties: The Safety Car will:

(a)
Be brought into operation to neutralise a race upon the sole decision of the Clerk of the Course, or
(b)
Act in an intervention role if and when requested by the Clerk of the Course.
6.3
Fire-Fighting Intervention Vehicle(s): This service is intended to combat fires resulting from incidents on the track, pits or paddock. It will act as a back up to the roles of the Rescue Intervention and Extraction Intervention services.

(1)
Type / Equipment: Shall be a vehicle of either two(2) or four(4) wheel drive with seating for a crew of up to four(4) persons. It should be parked in pit lane to facilitate access by the Clerk of the Course and should have:

(a)
Flashing yellow / amber light(s) the roof, and
(b)
Extinguishants: Appendix Two Schedule A details the type of extinguishants considered suitable for dealing with vehicle fires. Event organisers are recommended to liaise with the District Fire Commander on extinguishants suitable for all other fire risk.
(2)
Duties: To act as second intervention and must fulfil two basic requirements:

(a)
To reach the fire and isolate the driver from it within the shortest time, and
(b)
To have adequate and appropriate means to completely extinguish the fire, or suppress the fire until further fire service units attend.
6.4
Medical Intervention Vehicle(s): The circuit medical service is organised in order to come to the aid of drivers or any other persons injured in accidents occurring on the circuit during a Meeting or Event and including all official testing/qualifying.

(1)
Type / Equipment: Shall be an ambulance or equivalent, as determined by the District Ambulance Commander, equipped to provide appropriate medical care and has the ability to transport patients under emergency conditions on public roads.
(2)
Manning: For all Race Meetings or Events irrespective of event status the person responsible for Medical services shall act at all times under the authority of, and have adequate means of communication with, the Clerk of the Course.

(a)
For Clubmans permitted Race Meetings or Events the Medical Services shall be at least under the direction of a person who has:

(i)
Successfully completed a first aid course conducted by the NZ Red Cross Society or the St John’s Ambulance Association, and;
(ii)
Arranged for either a NZ Ambulance Board Paramedic or qualified Medical Doctor living in close proximity to the Event venue to be on standby, and;
(iii)
Is fully conversant with the Event Safety Plan and these regulations.
(b)
For all other National or higher permitted Race Meetings or Events the Medical Services shall be at least under the direction of a NZ Ambulance Board Paramedic who;

(i)
Is fully conversant with the Event Safety Plan and these regulations, and
(ii)
Has at least one(1) operational resuscitation unit in an intervention vehicle or inside a permanent or temporary structure.
(3)
Duties:

(a)
Supply the initial level of medical support required at the scene.
(b)
To be able to resuscitate and stabilise the condition of the injured driver or advise the Clerk of the Course on the services required at the scene of the emergency.
6.5
Rescue Intervention Vehicle(s) (First Intervention):

(1)
Type / Equipment: There are two types of Rescue Intervention Vehicle:

(a)
Quad Bike: These are a four-wheel motorcycle of either two(2) or four(4) wheel drive. The bike shall be equipped with;

(i)
A minimum of one(1) flashing beacon, visible from at least 200metres in daylight conditions and visible through a horizontal plane of 360 degrees. These beacons shall be amber in colour. Additionally, extra amber beacons may be fitted as desired. These beacon(s) shall be used whenever the vehicle is moving to an incident and travelling on or near the racing surface, and shall be turned off at all other times.
(ii)
Suitable mountings enabling quick release for at least one(1) extinguisher of;

  • ABC Extinguishant of 2.0kg capacity, or
  • AFFF Extinguishant of 2.4 litres capacity.
(iii)
A towrope with a quick method of attachment enabling its use for towing disabled vehicles to a position of safety.
(iv)
A method of communication with the Clerk of the Course. The preferred system being a hands free two-way system enabling the rider to communicate directly while either on the bike or at the scene of any incident.
Notes:
1. A Quad bike is an ideal vehicle for first intervention purposes.
2. When using a quad bike for the purpose of towing, the operator must ensure that it is being operated within the manufacturer’s specifications for towing.
(b)
Vehicle: A vehicle of either two(2) or four(4) wheel drive with seating for a crew of up to four(4) persons is required to cover such duties as first or second intervention.

(i)
These vehicles shall be equipped with a minimum of one(1) flashing beacon, visible from at least 200metres in daylight conditions and visible through a horizontal plane of 360 degrees. These beacons shall be amber in colour. Additionally, extra amber beacons may be fitted as desired. These beacon(s) shall be used whenever the vehicle is moving to an incident and travelling on or near the racing surface, and shall be turned off at all other times.
(ii)
The vehicle must be in direct two-way communication with Race Control at all times enabling the Clerk of the Course to be kept fully informed.
(2)
Manning:

(a)
Quad Bike: The rider should be a person with a sound knowledge of this Schedule and one who can confidently keep the Clerk of the Course appraised of the requirements at any incident scene. All Quad riders must wear an ATV helmet appropriate for quad bike operation.
(b)
Vehicle: The driver shall be attired in fire resistant clothing including gloves and a balaclava and the vehicle shall be in direct two-way communication with Race Control at all times enabling the Clerk of the Course to be kept fully informed.
All additional crew must be equipped for the task they are to perform, such as;

  • A fire marshal will be equipped in full fire resistant clothing, and
  • A Doctor, Paramedic or trained first aid person preferably in coloured overalls or clearly marked clothing so that they are easily identifiable.
(3)
Duties:

(a)
To have the means and equipment for the release of any persons trapped as the result of an accident on the track, or provide immediate information to the Clerk of the Course on the equipment required to effect the extraction of the driver. It can be integrated with the role of an Extrication Intervention Vehicle or carried out in tandem.
(b)
To suppress or extinguish a fire.
(c)
To enable any damaged vehicle to be towed to a position of safety by way of a rope.
(d)
An intervention vehicle, manned by Intervention, medical and firefighting personnel, shall follow the field for the first lap of any race. Should the speed of the vehicles or the length of the circuit make it impractical for them to cover an entire lap, they should follow the field as far as practical and then take up their allotted positions.
6.6
Extrication Intervention Vehicle(s) (Second Intervention):

(1)
Type / Equipment: As detailed for Rescue Intervention Vehicles above.
(2)
Manning: As detailed for Rescue Intervention Vehicles above.
(3)
Duties:

(a)
To be able to remove an injured driver from his car in a condition of safety, and
(b)
To suppress or extinguish a fire.
(c)
To enable any damaged vehicle to be towed to a position of safety by way of a rope.
6.7
Other Vehicles: Includes such vehicles as recovery trucks, cranes and track barrier repair vehicles:

(1)
Type / Equipment: Vehicles should ideally be utility or flat deck light trucks or HIAB-type trucks of either two or four wheel drive capable of crossing all terrain either inside or outside the perimeter of the circuit. These vehicles shall be equipped with a minimum of one(1) flashing beacon, visible from at least 200metres in daylight conditions and visible through a horizontal plane of 360 degrees. These beacons shall be amber in colour. Additionally, extra amber beacons may be fitted as desired. These beacon(s) shall be used whenever the vehicle is moving to an incident and travelling on or near the racing surface, and shall be turned off at all other times.
(2)
Manning: The crew should be attired in coloured overalls or clearly marked clothing suitable for the tasks required and such that identifies their role.
(3)
Duties:

(a)
The removal of damaged vehicles from the circuit, or
(b)
The repair of damage to the circuit sustained during competition.
(c)
Any other duties as directed by the Clerk of the Course.
7.
Event Testing:
7.1
Where a test day is held immediately prior to, or as part of, a Meeting or Event, the minimum safety levels shall be:

(1)
Race Control: Shall be manned by the Clerk of the Course and/or his assistant(s), in sufficient numbers to adequately control the activities on the circuit.
(2)
Flag Points: Each Flag Point required to be manned in accordance with Part Two Article 3.3 above, should be manned by at least one(1) marshal, in communication with Race Control, who should be equipped with a minimum of:

(a)
One(1) Red flag
(b)
One(1) Yellow flag
(c)
One(1) Yellow/red striped flag
(d)
One(1) portable fire extinguisher of at least 4Kg capacity.
(3)
Intervention Vehicles: There should be sufficient intervention vehicles commensurate with the total number of testing vehicles, but in any case shall not be below the minimum of:

(a)
One(1) Course Car
(b)
One(1) Fire Fighting Intervention Vehicle
(c)
One(1) Medical Intervention Vehicle
(d)
One(1) Rescue Intervention Vehicle
(e)
Other Vehicles as required.
For these test days it is permissible to have one(1) vehicle covering more than one of the above requirements.
7.2
Additionally, the Chief Medical Officer of the Event or their delegated assistant shall be in attendance.
7.3
The emergency services (local hospital, ambulance, fire) are to be advised.
8.
Specific Requirement for Truck Race Interventions: Throughout the duration of all truck racing or practice Intervention crews and vehicles shall be confined to positions that afford both first and second line of protection or are stationed in the pit lane.
No intervention crew will be deployed without the authority of the Clerk of the Course and not before the practice or race has been stopped.

Part Three – Rallies and Rallysprints

Note: This part should be read in conjunction with Appendix Three Schedule R and Schedule RS.

Preamble: This Part deals specifically with Rallies and Rallysprints (which are by their very nature a single stage Rally) from an event organiser’s perspective.
1.
Safety Plan:
1.1
For each event there will be a Safety Plan. The Clerk of the Course or an assistant will direct its implementation during the Event.
Note: A Safety Plan template for Rally Events may be found on the MotorSport NZ website (www.motorsport.org.nz).
1.2
This safety plan shall include:

(1)
The location of the Rally Headquarters (Rally Control).
(2)
Officials Contact Schedule (the names of the various people in charge);

(a)
Clerk of the Course.
(b)
Chief Medical officer.
(c)
Chief Safety officer.
(d)
Safety officers/managers for each special stage.
(3)
The addresses and telephone numbers of the various safety services;

(a)
Police.
(b)
Hospitals.
(c)
Emergency medical services.
(d)
Firefighting services.
(e)
Breakdown services
(f)
Red Cross, St John Ambulance (or equivalent).
(4)
The full itinerary with detailed road sections.
(5)
The safety plan for each special stage, which must list safety officers/managers, emergency services, GPS coordinates for the start, the finish and intermediary points, for that stage, telephone numbers, etc, plus a detailed map of the special stage.
(6)
The safety plan must specifically address issues in each of the following areas:

(a)
Safety of the public.
(b)
Safety of the competing crews.
(c)
Safety of the officials of the event.
(d)
Fuel safety protocols as described in the Code of Practice – Fuel.
(7)
With the exception of Rallysprints, a draft of the safety plan must reach the Permit Issuing Authority at least four(4) weeks prior to the start.
For Rallysprints a draft of the safety plan must reach the Permit Issuing Authority at least three(3) weeks prior to the start.
Any comments on the structure of the plan will be advised by the Permit Issuing Authority as soon as practicable.
2.
Control of Event: The Rally Headquarters is the centre of the event supervision and direction and should provide the Clerk of the Course and assistants with the facilities necessary to perform these duties in suitable working conditions. The Clerk of the Course or nominee shall remain in the Headquarters for the duration of all competition activities.
Note: For Rallysprints the control of the event may be in a caravan, tent or large vehicle on site.
3.
Safety of the Public and Officials:
3.1
General Public Safety: A major priority of the safety plan is to ensure the safety of the general public including spectators, residents and other occupiers affected by the road closures.
3.2
Refuelling and Servicing: Where the public is permitted access to areas where refuelling or servicing will take place, consideration to their safety should be outlined in the safety plan.
3.3
Stage Security Vehicles:

(1)
This group consists of: SAFETY CAR; WARNING CAR(S) (00 and 0); SWEEPER(S).
(2)
The stage security vehicles must have an event door banner on the two(2) front doors. This shall carry “SAFETY” or “00” or “0” or “SWEEPER” as appropriate.
(3)
The warning and sweeper cars must be equipped with warning roof lights and audible warning system. It is recommended that the safety car carry similar equipment.
(4)
The crews of the safety and warning cars must have considerable rally experience and must be able to give the Clerk of the Course full information and comments concerning the conditions along the route.
3.4
Safety on Road Sections: The itinerary and time schedule must take traffic conditions and the crossing of built-up areas into consideration.
3.5
Safety of Officials: Organisers must ensure that in performing their duties officials are not required to place themselves in danger.
4.
Safety of the Competing Crews:
4.1
Safety Services:

(1)
At the start of each special stage (as a minimum):

  • One(1) medical first intervention vehicle (FIV);
  • First Aid personnel as specified in the current Motorsport Manual;
  • Suitable communications equipment to maintain contact with HQ.
(2)
At the intermediary points on the route for long stages (greater than 30km):

  • One(1) medical first intervention vehicle;
  • First Aid personnel as specified in the current Motorsport Manual;
  • Suitable communications equipment to maintain contact with HQ.
(3)
At the finish of each special stage (as a minimum):

  • One(1) fire extinguisher of a minimum capacity of 4kg;
  • Suitable communications equipment to maintain contact with HQ.
Note: For Rallysprints at least one(1) intermediary point shall be established for communication purposes only, refer Part Three Article 4.3.
4.2
Preventative Measures (Signalling and road markings):

(1)
Roads and access roads leading to stages must be closed to traffic. This must be done in the following manner:

(a)
Major or through roads, or any road along which traffic could be expected, must be blocked and manned by a marshal, and
(b)
Short no-exit roads (e.g. to farms, etc) must be blocked or taped in accordance with the event taping policy.
(2)
It shall be the responsibility of the Safety Car to check that the appropriate closure method is in place and to immediately advise the Rally HQ (rally control) of any omissions which must be rectified prior to the commencement of the special stage.
4.3
Supervision:

(1)
For events not utilising a Rallysafe or similar approved Safety Tracking System only, a communication network (set up approximately every 15km) unique to each special stage, and in direct contact with Rally HQ, must be established to allow the vehicles to be tracked and the running of the rally to be supervised.
(2)
The tracking of vehicles, on the special stage, must be carried out either at Rally Headquarters (rally control) or by the special stage safety officer. Some form of tracking chart (electronic or otherwise) should be used either on the special stage by the special stage safety officer or at rally headquarters. Each organiser must draw up, and show in the safety plan, this procedure for tracking vehicles and must also list the procedure to be followed in the event of a missing competitor.
(3)
Each communication point shall be identified in the road book and by a sign at least 550mm in diameter, bearing the communication point symbol. The sign symbol must be in black on a blue background.
(4)
In addition there should be a yellow warning sign 100m prior to the communication point.
(5)
Any FIV within a stage must be in direct communication with Rally HQ. An additional sign (red cross) should be located beneath the communication point sign at this point.
(6)
For Rallysprints, at least one(1) communication point mid stage shall be established and able to communicate directly with event control as well as the start and finish points.
4.4
Evacuation:

(1)
Evacuation routes should be planned for each special stage. They must be clearly shown in the safety plan (by a map or diagram).

Part Four – ClubSport Events

Note: This part should be read in conjunction with Appendix Five, Schedule C and Schedule DR.

Preamble: The regulations contained in this Part apply to all ClubSport Events as defined in Appendix Five with the exceptions of;

(1)
(2)
(3)
For Motorkhanas given the nature of such events a safety plan is not a prerequisite however organisers are advised to consider the basic safety measures detailed in Article 1.2(1), (2) and (3) of this Part when planning events.
For Sporting Trials the event safety requirements will be specified in Appendix Five Schedule CK available as a separate booklet from MotorSport NZ.
For Car Trials the event safety requirements will be specified in Appendix Five Schedule T available as a separate booklet from MotorSport NZ.
For Regularity Trials the safety planning requirements as detailed in Part Two of this Schedule should be applied as if it was a Clubmans Race event.
1.
Safety Plan:
1.1
For each event there will be a Safety Plan. The Clerk of the Course or an assistant will direct its implementation during the event.
Note: A Safety Plan template for ClubSport Events may be found on the MotorSport NZ website (www.motorsport.org.nz).
1.2
The plan may differ in its complexity between the levels required for the varying types of ClubSport events but in all cases shall describe the steps the organisers will take to:

(1)
Protect the public and spectators;
(2)
Protect the officials;
(3)
Protect the competitor;
(4)
Provide fire, medical and rescue services in the event of an accident;
(5)
Recover vehicles involved in accidents;
(6)
Provide a set of conditions for continuation of the event after an accident.
1.3
The Safety Plan shall include a diagram of the venue, (preferably drawn to scale), showing the position of any protective barriers, spectator areas, marshal points, medical/first aid units, ambulance, rescue and recovery units, fire extinguishers/appliances as applicable. All roads and other identifying features should be named. If possible include a GPS reference, which greatly assists all emergency services in any needed deployment.
Note: In a number of instances organisers after taking into account the layout of the venue may decide to restrict spectator access to a very limited number of areas and designate all the remaining area prohibited access or “no go” areas. In such cases the venue diagram should clearly note these features.
1.4
The Safety Plan shall include;

(1)
The location of the event control post.
(2)
The names of the various people in charge,

  • Clerk of the Course including any assistants or deputies,
  • Safety Officer
(3)
The contact details for safety services,

  • Police,
  • Fire service,
  • Hospitals,
  • Emergency medical services and
  • Breakdown services.
(4)
Reference to the Code of Practice – Fuel.
The safety plan shall specifically address issues of spectator, competing crews and officials’ safety.
The safety plan shall allow for adequate numbers of marshals to control the event and members of the public. The level of training of these marshals must also be set down.
1.5
A draft of the plan must be submitted to the Permit Issuing Steward along with the event permit application.
Notes:
1. The Permit Issuing Steward will check the submitted draft for compliance with the regulations.
2. The Organising permit will remain provisional until such time as the event safety plan receives approval.
2.
Control of the Event:
2.1
Event Control Post: This control post (e.g. caravan, van, tent etc) is the centre of the event supervision and direction and should provide the Clerk of the Course and assistant(s) with the facilities necessary to perform these duties. The Clerk of the Course or assistant(s) shall remain at the control post for the duration of the competition activities.
2.2
Communication: The Clerk of the Course must have a means of immediate contact with the start, finish and all intermediate marshal points along with other key officials including Intervention and/or First Aid vehicle/s (e.g. radio).
2.3
Medical service: The attendance of a qualified first aid official with a complete first aid kit is compulsory. Included with the first aid kit will be some form of mobile shelter capable of protecting a patient from the elements.
3.
Safety of the Public and Officials:
3.1
General Public Safety: A major priority of the safety plan is to ensure the safety of the general public including spectators, residents and other occupiers affected by the road closures.
Organisers must ensure that adequate information is available for spectators showing clearly how they can get to good safe viewing points. These viewing points need to be constructed and manned in accordance with the layout depicted in the event Safety Plan.
3.2
Refuelling and Servicing: Where the public is permitted access to areas where refuelling or servicing will take place, consideration to their safety should be outlined in the safety plan.
3.3
Event Security Vehicles:

(1)
This group consists of: a Clearance Car and Intervention Vehicle(s).
Note: It is possible use one(1) vehicle for both roles.
(2)
In cases where it is not possible to view clearly the entire course from the event control post or start line, the Clearance Car shall ensure that the course is clear and that spectators are in areas of safety prior to each round of the competition.
The crew of the Clearance Car should have event organisation and competition experience and must be able to give the Clerk of the Course full information and comments concerning the conditions along the course.
(3)
The Intervention Vehicle(s) shall enable a qualified first aid official along with a person capable of operating a fire extinguisher to be transported safely to the scene of any incident immediately on request from the Clerk of the Course.
(4)
Ideally the Clearance Car and Intervention Vehicle(s) should be equipped with warning roof lights and audible warning system. The vehicle’s hazard flashers should be used if roof lights are not fitted.
3.4
Safety of Officials: Organisers shall ensure that in performing their duties officials are not required to place themselves in danger.
4.
Safety of the Competing Crews:
4.1
Safety Services:

(1)
Vehicles: At the start area of the event (as a minimum):

  • One(1) first intervention vehicle (FIV);
  • Clearance car.
Note: It is possible use one(1) vehicle for both roles.
(2)
Intermediary points on the course: Except for those events where all parts of the course are clearly visible from the event control post, intermediate marshal posts shall be established along the course in accordance with the course characteristics, bearing in mind light and weather conditions and ensuring that;

(a)
No section of the road may escape observation by sight or sound, with the exception of small sections of the course (not exceeding 100m) obscured by a road undulation, buildings, natural landscape or undergrowth, and
(b)
Each point has radio communications with event control, start and finish line and all other intermediary points.
(3)
Intermediary points function and equipment: The function is to monitor the progress of cars and report any stoppages or hazards, which occur.
They shall be equipped with;

(a)
Red flags to wave at competing vehicles to warn when the road ahead has become unsafe or impassable.
Note: For those events conducted entirely on a MotorSport NZ licenced circuit, the use of the red lights from an approved signal light system may replace the red flags. Red flags must be immediately available at all points.
(b)
Fire extinguisher with a minimum capacity of 0.9kg.
(c)
Radio communication equipment.
4.2
Access roads onto the course:

(1)
Roads and access roads leading onto the course must be closed to traffic. This must be done in the following manner:

(a)
Major or through roads, or any road along which traffic could be expected, must be blocked and manned by a marshal, and
(b)
Short no-exit roads (e.g. to farms, etc) and/or farm access gates must be blocked or taped.
(2)
It shall be the responsibility of the Clearance Car to check that the appropriate closure method is in place and to immediately advise the Event Control Post of any omissions which must be rectified prior to the commencement or continuation of the competition.
4.3
Fire Fighting Service: This Service is intended to provide only the basic requirements of a fire resulting from an incident on the course or in the pit paddock area.
In addition to the extinguisher requirements specified for the Intervention vehicle(s) and the intermediary posts fire extinguishers with a minimum capacity of 2kg must be available at the start and the finish.
4.4
Evacuation: Evacuation routes should be planned for and clearly shown in the safety plan (by a map or diagram).
At all times the evacuation routes immediately adjacent to the course shall be kept clear for Fire, Rescue or Ambulances Services to enter or leave the course.